OLDIES SUNDAY: 6 Super Cat Intl. Collabs You Haven’t Heard In A While


You know him as the Wild Indian, the Wild Apache, the Don of all Dons, but he is also known as Super Cat! One of the legendary Deejays from Jamaica, Super Cat commanded the crowd, and ruled the airwaves. Today on Oldies Sunday (we’re back after a few months), we won’t highlight the hits, as you know them well, but refresh your memory or introduce to you International singles that featured the Don Dadda. Let’s go!

Dem Nuh Worry We (Hip Hop Ragga Remix) ft. Heavy D. (1992)

Many know the original version over Dancehall production, but this Hip Hop version was a hit in the US clubs. Produced/Remixed by DJ Eddie F., the combination of Super Cat and the late Rapper/Producer Heavy D was a winner no matter what Riddim it rode! Me love mi Chicken and mi Goat well curry!

Dolly My Baby (Bad Boy Remix) ft. Mary J. Blige, 3rd Eye, Puff Daddy & Biggie Smalls (1993)

Super Cat was well respected in the Hip Hop crowd, and this remix is one of the few examples of that. Co-Produced by 3rd Eye and Puff Daddy who added verses, Mary J. Blige delivered the backing vocals and featured the debut recording of the late Biggie Smalls who was then unknown. A lot of history in one track as Mary went on to be the Queen of Hip Hop/R&B, Super Cat became a Dancehall legend, Puff Daddy went on to be one of the great Hip Hop CEOs, Biggie went on to be a legend in Hip Hop, and 3rd Eye, who was one of the first Hip Hop acts signed to Motown Records, and was argued to be the creator of the term “Bling Bling” (Lil Wayne was to argue that he coined the term in the late 90s with his single of the same name).

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Jamaica, New York, Sheryl Lee Ralph, Pop Music, Dance Music, 13thStreetPromotions, Oldies Sunday, In The Evening, Blog, Music, Singer, Actress, 80s

OLDIES SUNDAY: @TheSherylRalph – In The Evening (1984)


You’ve seen her on TV, you’ve witnessed her performances on Broadway, you’ve assisted in her various causes over the years, but did you know Sheryl Lee Ralph is also a Singer? Today’s Oldies Sunday showcases a moment in her singing career with “In The Evening“! Produced by Trevor Lawrence and written by Lawrence and Frank Musker, this Dance/Pop single was released in 1984 and was a part of her only album, “In The Evening” on the The New York Music Company Label. On the single, Sheryl sings about the challenges of living in New York City, but all that is pushed aside when she becomes a part of the nightlife where she states, “The real me comes alive“.

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OLDIES SUNDAY: @KingStitchie – Great Ambition (1987)


Today we’re taking you back to the year 1987 with Recording Artist Lt. Stitchie! Here we feature his track “Great Ambition” which was produced by Jammy’s Records (King Jammy’s) on the “Kuff Riddim“. In the song, Stitchie speaks on being an ambitious young man while encouraging listeners to be ambitious, listing the goals he’d like to achieve including owning a home, and working to make all this possible. A key part of the single is his Dancehall remix of the 1956 American single, “Que Sera Sera” which was performed by Singer/Actress Doris Day.

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OLDIES SUNDAY: @ReggaeSting 1991


With yesterday’s staging of Sting 2015 receiving not so stellar reviews from some attendees, I thought for the final “Oldies Sunday” of 2015 I’d feature one of the earlier shows. In Sting 1991, there were performances from the likes of Frankie Paul (who wasn’t able to attend last night’s event due to ailments), Tony Rebel, Shine Head, Culture, Freddie McGregor, and of course a clash between Ninja Man and SuperCat. If you’re one of the disappointed members, maybe this earlier staging can brush away some bad vibes. Check it out below and share your thoughts in the comments section.

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OLDIES SUNDAY: Carl Douglas – Kung Fu Fighting (1974)


KungFuFighting

Today’s Oldies Sunday Selection comes from Jamaican Recording Artist, Carl Douglas. Titled “Kung Fu Fighting“, this was produced by Biddu for PYE Records in 1974. At that time, Martial Art films (termed “Chopsocky“) were increasing in popularity worldwide (especially in Jamaica), and at a time during the rise of Disco music, Carl created it as a tribute.

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